Change: Things should change

Working for my future.

Watching my parents work so hard to provide us with the most they could. Unfortunately we did not have a lot like others. My parents didn’t make enough income to provide us with our wants, but we were just thankful that my parents were able to provide us with a home, food and clothing. For school I remember being bullied because I wore a lot of hand me downs and not being vocal or tough. Also, we did not have transportation for school so I would walk and get to school sweaty. Yes, we struggled but our parents taught us the best moral which was to finish school and keep thriving no matter what obstacles came my way. In our community we don’t have a lot of resources that really helped the Hispanic community because we are unheard.I remember this scholarship opportunity called “Pops”, which pretty much was a program that helped you get ready for the real world and they helped you get a job in your preferred field. I applied and was selected for a interview.Turns out they had already chosen the candidates for the scholarship and just gave me a interview to just make it seem like they interviewed me. I later found out that they chose people who were friends or relatives of City of Pahokee and the Hispanic population was very small so it really made me feel that I was not part of the community. Depicted all odds, I was able to go to college and work in my community who really didn’t do anything physically to befit me, but my community did made me mentally stronger.

My move to Pahokee, FL

When my husband decided that our family would move to his hometown of Pahokee, FL. I knew it would be a significant change moving from a metropolitan city, 1,000,000+ to a small city of about 6,000 people. My husbands return home was two fold. He wanted to be close to his family-mother, father, brothers and sister but also wanted to help his community by becoming the Mayor, which meant for him using all that he had learned and experienced, bringing it back home to Pahokee. He was adamant about returning home from the day we met in 1993 at Alabama State University. This was instilled in him from his graduation speech in 1992 at Pahokee High School. What he took away from that speech was that the speaker encouraged them to go out and gain knowledge and experience but don’t forget about returning home to help. From 1992, he kept this in his heart and vowed to return home to help his city.

Hard on your own

When I graduate from high school and went to college. I. Was the first in my family go off to school. My family was poor so he will work and different jobs he had to ask for loans. It was very hard.

Gheto

I grew up in a ruff community on 8 street. I had to do a lot of things on my own I haven’t have much help with my parents.

THE CHANGE OF THE NEW GENERATION

Around the time I was growing up in the early 2000s my community was very involved in activities around the community and with our kids here. Now in 2019 we cant get that much involvement to support our community and kids.